Fluctuations in clinical symptoms with changes in serum 25(OH) vitamin D levels in autistic children: Three cases report.

Nutr Neurosci. 2018 Apr 08;:1-4

Authors: Jia F, Shan L, Wang B, Li H, Feng J, Xu Z, Saad K

Abstract
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder caused by complicated interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Clinical trials, including case reports, case-control studies, and a double-blinded randomized clinical study, have suggested that high-dose vitamin D3 regimens may ameliorate the core symptoms of ASD. Vitamin D3 supplementation was effective in about three-quarters of children with ASD. To further investigate the relationship between vitamin D and ASD symptoms in vitamin D-responsive autistic children, changes in symptoms were assessed in three children with ASD who were given vitamin D3 supplementation followed by a long interruption. The core symptoms of ASD were remarkably improved during the vitamin D3 supplementation period when serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)]D levels reached over 40.0 ng/mL. However, symptoms reappeared after the supplementation was stopped, when serum 25(OH)D levels fell below 30.0 ng/mL but were again improved with re-administration of vitamin D3 after the interruption, when serum 25(OH)D levels exceeded 40.0 ng/mL. Overall, these results showed that the core symptoms of ASD fluctuated in severity with changes in serum 25(OH)D levels in children, indicating that maintaining a responsive 25(OH)D level is important for treating ASD. Maintaining a serum 25(OH)D level between 40.0 and 100.0 ng/ml may be optimal for producing therapeutic effects in vitamin D-responsive individuals with ASD.

PMID: 29629638 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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