0 comments on “Newfoundland town leading the way as Canada’s ‘most autism-friendly’”

Newfoundland town leading the way as Canada’s ‘most autism-friendly’

One small town on Canada’s east coast is leading the way in accommodating people with autism, one sensory calming room at a time.

Channel-Port aux Basques, a Newfoundland town of fewer than 5,000 residents, is home to a community group called Autism Involves Me. Co-founders Joan Chaisson and April Billard launched the group after Chaisson, a retired special-ed teacher, started coaching Billard’s son who has autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

“I fell in love with the child and the world of autism,” Chaisson told CTV’s Your Morning on Wednesday. “It’s so nice to try and figure out what makes them successful.”

Each child is different, she says, to the point where the work is like a “puzzle.” And with AIM, Chaisson and Billard have launched simple, low-cost methods for communities to help make solving the puzzle easier. They provide parents with a library of resources, they offer training for local businesses, and they even helped turn a local hotel into an autism-friendly environment complete with a sensory calming room, quiet rooms for eating and specialized bedrooms.

The Public Health Agency of Canada estimates that one in 57 kids between the ages of five and 17 have autism in Newfoundland and Labrador. The rate isn’t much lower across the country — about one in 66 — but Chaisson’s town has faced particular challenges. Of the 300 children in elementary school there, 14 have been diagnosed with autism.

Chaisson and Billard’s efforts have drawn national attention. On World Autism Day in April, Today’s Parent magazine named Channel-Port aux Basques “the most autism-friendly town in Canada.” The title has caught on, and Chaisson hopes AIM’s initiatives spread across the country.

“It’s something that doesn’t cost a lot of money. You have to go out and meet with the people face to face,” she said. “It’s very easy to bring it across the country.”

0 comments on “Newfoundland town leading the way as Canada’s ‘most autism-friendly’”

Newfoundland town leading the way as Canada’s ‘most autism-friendly’

One small town on Canada’s east coast is leading the way in accommodating people with autism, one sensory calming room at a time.

Channel-Port aux Basques, a Newfoundland town of fewer than 5,000 residents, is home to a community group called Autism Involves Me. Co-founders Joan Chaisson and April Billard launched the group after Chaisson, a retired special-ed teacher, started coaching Billard’s son who has autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

“I fell in love with the child and the world of autism,” Chaisson told CTV’s Your Morning on Wednesday. “It’s so nice to try and figure out what makes them successful.”

Each child is different, she says, to the point where the work is like a “puzzle.” And with AIM, Chaisson and Billard have launched simple, low-cost methods for communities to help make solving the puzzle easier. They provide parents with a library of resources, they offer training for local businesses, and they even helped turn a local hotel into an autism-friendly environment complete with a sensory calming room, quiet rooms for eating and specialized bedrooms.

The Public Health Agency of Canada estimates that one in 57 kids between the ages of five and 17 have autism in Newfoundland and Labrador. The rate isn’t much lower across the country — about one in 66 — but Chaisson’s town has faced particular challenges. Of the 300 children in elementary school there, 14 have been diagnosed with autism.

Chaisson and Billard’s efforts have drawn national attention. On World Autism Day in April, Today’s Parent magazine named Channel-Port aux Basques “the most autism-friendly town in Canada.” The title has caught on, and Chaisson hopes AIM’s initiatives spread across the country.

“It’s something that doesn’t cost a lot of money. You have to go out and meet with the people face to face,” she said. “It’s very easy to bring it across the country.”

0 comments on “New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons”

New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons

Autism doesn’t slow these identical twins down, especially when it comes to running. 

Alex and Jamie, 28, of Great Neck, New York, love nothing more than running marathons. 

After they realized their passion at 15 years old, their parents Robyn and Allen Schneider have always encouraged the hobby. 

Alex grew to be a competitive runner, training six days a week and completing half-marathons at an average of an hour and 16 minutes – an incredibly impressive time even for able-bodied competitive runners.

“It was just beyond words,” their mom Robyn told InsideEdition.com. “We were so excited, so thrilled for him, and he has no idea how great he is.”

For Jamie, the pastime is more recreational. He trains three days a week and prefers leisurely runs with his parents.

“He’s much more social,” his mom said. “He likes to stop and take a break, take a water stop, walk a little. He listens to an iPod when he’s running and he likes running behind girls with ponytails. I think [he likes] the ‘swish, swish’ motion of the ponytail.”

But being a parent to the identical twins hasn’t always been so easy, Robyn said.

“Growing up, one was a little bit more difficult than the other,” Robyn explained. “It was kind of like a chain reaction and they had a lot of behaviors and it was really hard to communicate because neither of them are verbal.”

She said they were diagnosed at 21 months, and they continue to need help with day-to-day tasks, like remembering to eat, putting on a jacket in cold weather and crossing the street.

“Autism is a lifelong disability,” she said. “They’re still not communicative, so it’s even difficult today.”

While Alex and Jamie grew up learning to swim, doing karate and riding horseback, they have always seemed ambivalent to the hobbies. But everything changed when they started running.

“[They were] smiling a lot, jumping up and down, [they] just seemed really at peace and just a different kind of happiness,” Robyn explained. “They seem to be eager to go when we tell them we’re going running. We just saw something different in them – something light up. It was really wonderful for us because we had never seen that before.”

Since then, becoming strong runners has been a family effort.

Robyn and her husband are in charge of their diets, she explained, and she tries to make sure her sons are eating healthy to stay in shape.

In terms of training, Robyn explained her sons have a different threshold for pain and can’t express themselves when they’re injured.

“Alex was running with his cross-country team in high school with his coach and we didn’t realize it but he had a stress fracture and the only way we knew that was he was running down a hill and he was limping,” she recalled. “It’s a lot of observation for us and just a lot of carefully building up the mileage. And we make sure all their workouts are followed by recovery runs.”

Neither Jamie nor Alex can run alone. Some days they run with a coach, and other days, their parents will run or bike alongside them.

Alex is now preparing to run in the New York City Marathon accompanied by a coach, and Jamie is looking forward to cheering his brother on.

“It’s very heartwarming and there aren’t many things that we can really rejoice about, having two very severe kids with autism,” Robyn explained. “So the whole running experience gives us that opportunity to rejoice and celebrate.”

RELATED STORIES

Stray Dog Runs Half-Marathon and Is Awarded a Medal While in the Pound

Son Surprises Biological Mom at Pittsburgh Half Marathon in Emotional Moment

Man Runs Entire L.A. Marathon Backwards to Raise Money for Epilepsy Research

0 comments on “New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons”

New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons

Autism doesn’t slow these identical twins down, especially when it comes to running. 

Alex and Jamie, 28, of Great Neck, New York, love nothing more than running marathons. 

After they realized their passion at 15 years old, their parents Robyn and Allen Schneider have always encouraged the hobby. 

Alex grew to be a competitive runner, training six days a week and completing half-marathons at an average of an hour and 16 minutes – an incredibly impressive time even for able-bodied competitive runners.

“It was just beyond words,” their mom Robyn told InsideEdition.com. “We were so excited, so thrilled for him, and he has no idea how great he is.”

For Jamie, the pastime is more recreational. He trains three days a week and prefers leisurely runs with his parents.

“He’s much more social,” his mom said. “He likes to stop and take a break, take a water stop, walk a little. He listens to an iPod when he’s running and he likes running behind girls with ponytails. I think [he likes] the ‘swish, swish’ motion of the ponytail.”

But being a parent to the identical twins hasn’t always been so easy, Robyn said.

“Growing up, one was a little bit more difficult than the other,” Robyn explained. “It was kind of like a chain reaction and they had a lot of behaviors and it was really hard to communicate because neither of them are verbal.”

She said they were diagnosed at 21 months, and they continue to need help with day-to-day tasks, like remembering to eat, putting on a jacket in cold weather and crossing the street.

“Autism is a lifelong disability,” she said. “They’re still not communicative, so it’s even difficult today.”

While Alex and Jamie grew up learning to swim, doing karate and riding horseback, they have always seemed ambivalent to the hobbies. But everything changed when they started running.

“[They were] smiling a lot, jumping up and down, [they] just seemed really at peace and just a different kind of happiness,” Robyn explained. “They seem to be eager to go when we tell them we’re going running. We just saw something different in them – something light up. It was really wonderful for us because we had never seen that before.”

Since then, becoming strong runners has been a family effort.

Robyn and her husband are in charge of their diets, she explained, and she tries to make sure her sons are eating healthy to stay in shape.

In terms of training, Robyn explained her sons have a different threshold for pain and can’t express themselves when they’re injured.

“Alex was running with his cross-country team in high school with his coach and we didn’t realize it but he had a stress fracture and the only way we knew that was he was running down a hill and he was limping,” she recalled. “It’s a lot of observation for us and just a lot of carefully building up the mileage. And we make sure all their workouts are followed by recovery runs.”

Neither Jamie nor Alex can run alone. Some days they run with a coach, and other days, their parents will run or bike alongside them.

Alex is now preparing to run in the New York City Marathon accompanied by a coach, and Jamie is looking forward to cheering his brother on.

“It’s very heartwarming and there aren’t many things that we can really rejoice about, having two very severe kids with autism,” Robyn explained. “So the whole running experience gives us that opportunity to rejoice and celebrate.”

RELATED STORIES

Stray Dog Runs Half-Marathon and Is Awarded a Medal While in the Pound

Son Surprises Biological Mom at Pittsburgh Half Marathon in Emotional Moment

Man Runs Entire L.A. Marathon Backwards to Raise Money for Epilepsy Research

0 comments on “New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons”

New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons

Autism doesn’t slow these identical twins down, especially when it comes to running. 

Alex and Jamie, 28, of Great Neck, New York, love nothing more than running marathons. 

After they realized their passion at 15 years old, their parents Robyn and Allen Schneider have always encouraged the hobby. 

Alex grew to be a competitive runner, training six days a week and completing half-marathons at an average of an hour and 16 minutes – an incredibly impressive time even for able-bodied competitive runners.

“It was just beyond words,” their mom Robyn told InsideEdition.com. “We were so excited, so thrilled for him, and he has no idea how great he is.”

For Jamie, the pastime is more recreational. He trains three days a week and prefers leisurely runs with his parents.

“He’s much more social,” his mom said. “He likes to stop and take a break, take a water stop, walk a little. He listens to an iPod when he’s running and he likes running behind girls with ponytails. I think [he likes] the ‘swish, swish’ motion of the ponytail.”

But being a parent to the identical twins hasn’t always been so easy, Robyn said.

“Growing up, one was a little bit more difficult than the other,” Robyn explained. “It was kind of like a chain reaction and they had a lot of behaviors and it was really hard to communicate because neither of them are verbal.”

She said they were diagnosed at 21 months, and they continue to need help with day-to-day tasks, like remembering to eat, putting on a jacket in cold weather and crossing the street.

“Autism is a lifelong disability,” she said. “They’re still not communicative, so it’s even difficult today.”

While Alex and Jamie grew up learning to swim, doing karate and riding horseback, they have always seemed ambivalent to the hobbies. But everything changed when they started running.

“[They were] smiling a lot, jumping up and down, [they] just seemed really at peace and just a different kind of happiness,” Robyn explained. “They seem to be eager to go when we tell them we’re going running. We just saw something different in them – something light up. It was really wonderful for us because we had never seen that before.”

Since then, becoming strong runners has been a family effort.

Robyn and her husband are in charge of their diets, she explained, and she tries to make sure her sons are eating healthy to stay in shape.

In terms of training, Robyn explained her sons have a different threshold for pain and can’t express themselves when they’re injured.

“Alex was running with his cross-country team in high school with his coach and we didn’t realize it but he had a stress fracture and the only way we knew that was he was running down a hill and he was limping,” she recalled. “It’s a lot of observation for us and just a lot of carefully building up the mileage. And we make sure all their workouts are followed by recovery runs.”

Neither Jamie nor Alex can run alone. Some days they run with a coach, and other days, their parents will run or bike alongside them.

Alex is now preparing to run in the New York City Marathon accompanied by a coach, and Jamie is looking forward to cheering his brother on.

“It’s very heartwarming and there aren’t many things that we can really rejoice about, having two very severe kids with autism,” Robyn explained. “So the whole running experience gives us that opportunity to rejoice and celebrate.”

RELATED STORIES

Stray Dog Runs Half-Marathon and Is Awarded a Medal While in the Pound

Son Surprises Biological Mom at Pittsburgh Half Marathon in Emotional Moment

Man Runs Entire L.A. Marathon Backwards to Raise Money for Epilepsy Research

0 comments on “New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons”

New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons

Autism doesn’t slow these identical twins down, especially when it comes to running. 

Alex and Jamie, 28, of Great Neck, New York, love nothing more than running marathons. 

After they realized their passion at 15 years old, their parents Robyn and Allen Schneider have always encouraged the hobby. 

Alex grew to be a competitive runner, training six days a week and completing half-marathons at an average of an hour and 16 minutes – an incredibly impressive time even for able-bodied competitive runners.

“It was just beyond words,” their mom Robyn told InsideEdition.com. “We were so excited, so thrilled for him, and he has no idea how great he is.”

For Jamie, the pastime is more recreational. He trains three days a week and prefers leisurely runs with his parents.

“He’s much more social,” his mom said. “He likes to stop and take a break, take a water stop, walk a little. He listens to an iPod when he’s running and he likes running behind girls with ponytails. I think [he likes] the ‘swish, swish’ motion of the ponytail.”

But being a parent to the identical twins hasn’t always been so easy, Robyn said.

“Growing up, one was a little bit more difficult than the other,” Robyn explained. “It was kind of like a chain reaction and they had a lot of behaviors and it was really hard to communicate because neither of them are verbal.”

She said they were diagnosed at 21 months, and they continue to need help with day-to-day tasks, like remembering to eat, putting on a jacket in cold weather and crossing the street.

“Autism is a lifelong disability,” she said. “They’re still not communicative, so it’s even difficult today.”

While Alex and Jamie grew up learning to swim, doing karate and riding horseback, they have always seemed ambivalent to the hobbies. But everything changed when they started running.

“[They were] smiling a lot, jumping up and down, [they] just seemed really at peace and just a different kind of happiness,” Robyn explained. “They seem to be eager to go when we tell them we’re going running. We just saw something different in them – something light up. It was really wonderful for us because we had never seen that before.”

Since then, becoming strong runners has been a family effort.

Robyn and her husband are in charge of their diets, she explained, and she tries to make sure her sons are eating healthy to stay in shape.

In terms of training, Robyn explained her sons have a different threshold for pain and can’t express themselves when they’re injured.

“Alex was running with his cross-country team in high school with his coach and we didn’t realize it but he had a stress fracture and the only way we knew that was he was running down a hill and he was limping,” she recalled. “It’s a lot of observation for us and just a lot of carefully building up the mileage. And we make sure all their workouts are followed by recovery runs.”

Neither Jamie nor Alex can run alone. Some days they run with a coach, and other days, their parents will run or bike alongside them.

Alex is now preparing to run in the New York City Marathon accompanied by a coach, and Jamie is looking forward to cheering his brother on.

“It’s very heartwarming and there aren’t many things that we can really rejoice about, having two very severe kids with autism,” Robyn explained. “So the whole running experience gives us that opportunity to rejoice and celebrate.”

RELATED STORIES

Stray Dog Runs Half-Marathon and Is Awarded a Medal While in the Pound

Son Surprises Biological Mom at Pittsburgh Half Marathon in Emotional Moment

Man Runs Entire L.A. Marathon Backwards to Raise Money for Epilepsy Research

0 comments on “New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons”

New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons

Autism doesn’t slow these identical twins down, especially when it comes to running. 

Alex and Jamie, 28, of Great Neck, New York, love nothing more than running marathons. 

After they realized their passion at 15 years old, their parents Robyn and Allen Schneider have always encouraged the hobby. 

Alex grew to be a competitive runner, training six days a week and completing half-marathons at an average of an hour and 16 minutes – an incredibly impressive time even for able-bodied competitive runners.

“It was just beyond words,” their mom Robyn told InsideEdition.com. “We were so excited, so thrilled for him, and he has no idea how great he is.”

For Jamie, the pastime is more recreational. He trains three days a week and prefers leisurely runs with his parents.

“He’s much more social,” his mom said. “He likes to stop and take a break, take a water stop, walk a little. He listens to an iPod when he’s running and he likes running behind girls with ponytails. I think [he likes] the ‘swish, swish’ motion of the ponytail.”

But being a parent to the identical twins hasn’t always been so easy, Robyn said.

“Growing up, one was a little bit more difficult than the other,” Robyn explained. “It was kind of like a chain reaction and they had a lot of behaviors and it was really hard to communicate because neither of them are verbal.”

She said they were diagnosed at 21 months, and they continue to need help with day-to-day tasks, like remembering to eat, putting on a jacket in cold weather and crossing the street.

“Autism is a lifelong disability,” she said. “They’re still not communicative, so it’s even difficult today.”

While Alex and Jamie grew up learning to swim, doing karate and riding horseback, they have always seemed ambivalent to the hobbies. But everything changed when they started running.

“[They were] smiling a lot, jumping up and down, [they] just seemed really at peace and just a different kind of happiness,” Robyn explained. “They seem to be eager to go when we tell them we’re going running. We just saw something different in them – something light up. It was really wonderful for us because we had never seen that before.”

Since then, becoming strong runners has been a family effort.

Robyn and her husband are in charge of their diets, she explained, and she tries to make sure her sons are eating healthy to stay in shape.

In terms of training, Robyn explained her sons have a different threshold for pain and can’t express themselves when they’re injured.

“Alex was running with his cross-country team in high school with his coach and we didn’t realize it but he had a stress fracture and the only way we knew that was he was running down a hill and he was limping,” she recalled. “It’s a lot of observation for us and just a lot of carefully building up the mileage. And we make sure all their workouts are followed by recovery runs.”

Neither Jamie nor Alex can run alone. Some days they run with a coach, and other days, their parents will run or bike alongside them.

Alex is now preparing to run in the New York City Marathon accompanied by a coach, and Jamie is looking forward to cheering his brother on.

“It’s very heartwarming and there aren’t many things that we can really rejoice about, having two very severe kids with autism,” Robyn explained. “So the whole running experience gives us that opportunity to rejoice and celebrate.”

RELATED STORIES

Stray Dog Runs Half-Marathon and Is Awarded a Medal While in the Pound

Son Surprises Biological Mom at Pittsburgh Half Marathon in Emotional Moment

Man Runs Entire L.A. Marathon Backwards to Raise Money for Epilepsy Research

0 comments on “New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons”

New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons

Autism doesn’t slow these identical twins down, especially when it comes to running. 

Alex and Jamie, 28, of Great Neck, New York, love nothing more than running marathons. 

After they realized their passion at 15 years old, their parents Robyn and Allen Schneider have always encouraged the hobby. 

Alex grew to be a competitive runner, training six days a week and completing half-marathons at an average of an hour and 16 minutes – an incredibly impressive time even for able-bodied competitive runners.

“It was just beyond words,” their mom Robyn told InsideEdition.com. “We were so excited, so thrilled for him, and he has no idea how great he is.”

For Jamie, the pastime is more recreational. He trains three days a week and prefers leisurely runs with his parents.

“He’s much more social,” his mom said. “He likes to stop and take a break, take a water stop, walk a little. He listens to an iPod when he’s running and he likes running behind girls with ponytails. I think [he likes] the ‘swish, swish’ motion of the ponytail.”

But being a parent to the identical twins hasn’t always been so easy, Robyn said.

“Growing up, one was a little bit more difficult than the other,” Robyn explained. “It was kind of like a chain reaction and they had a lot of behaviors and it was really hard to communicate because neither of them are verbal.”

She said they were diagnosed at 21 months, and they continue to need help with day-to-day tasks, like remembering to eat, putting on a jacket in cold weather and crossing the street.

“Autism is a lifelong disability,” she said. “They’re still not communicative, so it’s even difficult today.”

While Alex and Jamie grew up learning to swim, doing karate and riding horseback, they have always seemed ambivalent to the hobbies. But everything changed when they started running.

“[They were] smiling a lot, jumping up and down, [they] just seemed really at peace and just a different kind of happiness,” Robyn explained. “They seem to be eager to go when we tell them we’re going running. We just saw something different in them – something light up. It was really wonderful for us because we had never seen that before.”

Since then, becoming strong runners has been a family effort.

Robyn and her husband are in charge of their diets, she explained, and she tries to make sure her sons are eating healthy to stay in shape.

In terms of training, Robyn explained her sons have a different threshold for pain and can’t express themselves when they’re injured.

“Alex was running with his cross-country team in high school with his coach and we didn’t realize it but he had a stress fracture and the only way we knew that was he was running down a hill and he was limping,” she recalled. “It’s a lot of observation for us and just a lot of carefully building up the mileage. And we make sure all their workouts are followed by recovery runs.”

Neither Jamie nor Alex can run alone. Some days they run with a coach, and other days, their parents will run or bike alongside them.

Alex is now preparing to run in the New York City Marathon accompanied by a coach, and Jamie is looking forward to cheering his brother on.

“It’s very heartwarming and there aren’t many things that we can really rejoice about, having two very severe kids with autism,” Robyn explained. “So the whole running experience gives us that opportunity to rejoice and celebrate.”

RELATED STORIES

Stray Dog Runs Half-Marathon and Is Awarded a Medal While in the Pound

Son Surprises Biological Mom at Pittsburgh Half Marathon in Emotional Moment

Man Runs Entire L.A. Marathon Backwards to Raise Money for Epilepsy Research

0 comments on “New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons”

New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons

Autism doesn’t slow these identical twins down, especially when it comes to running. 

Alex and Jamie, 28, of Great Neck, New York, love nothing more than running marathons. 

After they realized their passion at 15 years old, their parents Robyn and Allen Schneider have always encouraged the hobby. 

Alex grew to be a competitive runner, training six days a week and completing half-marathons at an average of an hour and 16 minutes – an incredibly impressive time even for able-bodied competitive runners.

“It was just beyond words,” their mom Robyn told InsideEdition.com. “We were so excited, so thrilled for him, and he has no idea how great he is.”

For Jamie, the pastime is more recreational. He trains three days a week and prefers leisurely runs with his parents.

“He’s much more social,” his mom said. “He likes to stop and take a break, take a water stop, walk a little. He listens to an iPod when he’s running and he likes running behind girls with ponytails. I think [he likes] the ‘swish, swish’ motion of the ponytail.”

But being a parent to the identical twins hasn’t always been so easy, Robyn said.

“Growing up, one was a little bit more difficult than the other,” Robyn explained. “It was kind of like a chain reaction and they had a lot of behaviors and it was really hard to communicate because neither of them are verbal.”

She said they were diagnosed at 21 months, and they continue to need help with day-to-day tasks, like remembering to eat, putting on a jacket in cold weather and crossing the street.

“Autism is a lifelong disability,” she said. “They’re still not communicative, so it’s even difficult today.”

While Alex and Jamie grew up learning to swim, doing karate and riding horseback, they have always seemed ambivalent to the hobbies. But everything changed when they started running.

“[They were] smiling a lot, jumping up and down, [they] just seemed really at peace and just a different kind of happiness,” Robyn explained. “They seem to be eager to go when we tell them we’re going running. We just saw something different in them – something light up. It was really wonderful for us because we had never seen that before.”

Since then, becoming strong runners has been a family effort.

Robyn and her husband are in charge of their diets, she explained, and she tries to make sure her sons are eating healthy to stay in shape.

In terms of training, Robyn explained her sons have a different threshold for pain and can’t express themselves when they’re injured.

“Alex was running with his cross-country team in high school with his coach and we didn’t realize it but he had a stress fracture and the only way we knew that was he was running down a hill and he was limping,” she recalled. “It’s a lot of observation for us and just a lot of carefully building up the mileage. And we make sure all their workouts are followed by recovery runs.”

Neither Jamie nor Alex can run alone. Some days they run with a coach, and other days, their parents will run or bike alongside them.

Alex is now preparing to run in the New York City Marathon accompanied by a coach, and Jamie is looking forward to cheering his brother on.

“It’s very heartwarming and there aren’t many things that we can really rejoice about, having two very severe kids with autism,” Robyn explained. “So the whole running experience gives us that opportunity to rejoice and celebrate.”

RELATED STORIES

Stray Dog Runs Half-Marathon and Is Awarded a Medal While in the Pound

Son Surprises Biological Mom at Pittsburgh Half Marathon in Emotional Moment

Man Runs Entire L.A. Marathon Backwards to Raise Money for Epilepsy Research

0 comments on “New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons”

New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons

Autism doesn’t slow these identical twins down, especially when it comes to running. 

Alex and Jamie, 28, of Great Neck, New York, love nothing more than running marathons. 

After they realized their passion at 15 years old, their parents Robyn and Allen Schneider have always encouraged the hobby. 

Alex grew to be a competitive runner, training six days a week and completing half-marathons at an average of an hour and 16 minutes – an incredibly impressive time even for able-bodied competitive runners.

“It was just beyond words,” their mom Robyn told InsideEdition.com. “We were so excited, so thrilled for him, and he has no idea how great he is.”

For Jamie, the pastime is more recreational. He trains three days a week and prefers leisurely runs with his parents.

“He’s much more social,” his mom said. “He likes to stop and take a break, take a water stop, walk a little. He listens to an iPod when he’s running and he likes running behind girls with ponytails. I think [he likes] the ‘swish, swish’ motion of the ponytail.”

But being a parent to the identical twins hasn’t always been so easy, Robyn said.

“Growing up, one was a little bit more difficult than the other,” Robyn explained. “It was kind of like a chain reaction and they had a lot of behaviors and it was really hard to communicate because neither of them are verbal.”

She said they were diagnosed at 21 months, and they continue to need help with day-to-day tasks, like remembering to eat, putting on a jacket in cold weather and crossing the street.

“Autism is a lifelong disability,” she said. “They’re still not communicative, so it’s even difficult today.”

While Alex and Jamie grew up learning to swim, doing karate and riding horseback, they have always seemed ambivalent to the hobbies. But everything changed when they started running.

“[They were] smiling a lot, jumping up and down, [they] just seemed really at peace and just a different kind of happiness,” Robyn explained. “They seem to be eager to go when we tell them we’re going running. We just saw something different in them – something light up. It was really wonderful for us because we had never seen that before.”

Since then, becoming strong runners has been a family effort.

Robyn and her husband are in charge of their diets, she explained, and she tries to make sure her sons are eating healthy to stay in shape.

In terms of training, Robyn explained her sons have a different threshold for pain and can’t express themselves when they’re injured.

“Alex was running with his cross-country team in high school with his coach and we didn’t realize it but he had a stress fracture and the only way we knew that was he was running down a hill and he was limping,” she recalled. “It’s a lot of observation for us and just a lot of carefully building up the mileage. And we make sure all their workouts are followed by recovery runs.”

Neither Jamie nor Alex can run alone. Some days they run with a coach, and other days, their parents will run or bike alongside them.

Alex is now preparing to run in the New York City Marathon accompanied by a coach, and Jamie is looking forward to cheering his brother on.

“It’s very heartwarming and there aren’t many things that we can really rejoice about, having two very severe kids with autism,” Robyn explained. “So the whole running experience gives us that opportunity to rejoice and celebrate.”

RELATED STORIES

Stray Dog Runs Half-Marathon and Is Awarded a Medal While in the Pound

Son Surprises Biological Mom at Pittsburgh Half Marathon in Emotional Moment

Man Runs Entire L.A. Marathon Backwards to Raise Money for Epilepsy Research

0 comments on “New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons”

New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons

Autism doesn’t slow these identical twins down, especially when it comes to running. 

Alex and Jamie, 28, of Great Neck, New York, love nothing more than running marathons. 

After they realized their passion at 15 years old, their parents Robyn and Allen Schneider have always encouraged the hobby. 

Alex grew to be a competitive runner, training six days a week and completing half-marathons at an average of an hour and 16 minutes – an incredibly impressive time even for able-bodied competitive runners.

“It was just beyond words,” their mom Robyn told InsideEdition.com. “We were so excited, so thrilled for him, and he has no idea how great he is.”

For Jamie, the pastime is more recreational. He trains three days a week and prefers leisurely runs with his parents.

“He’s much more social,” his mom said. “He likes to stop and take a break, take a water stop, walk a little. He listens to an iPod when he’s running and he likes running behind girls with ponytails. I think [he likes] the ‘swish, swish’ motion of the ponytail.”

But being a parent to the identical twins hasn’t always been so easy, Robyn said.

“Growing up, one was a little bit more difficult than the other,” Robyn explained. “It was kind of like a chain reaction and they had a lot of behaviors and it was really hard to communicate because neither of them are verbal.”

She said they were diagnosed at 21 months, and they continue to need help with day-to-day tasks, like remembering to eat, putting on a jacket in cold weather and crossing the street.

“Autism is a lifelong disability,” she said. “They’re still not communicative, so it’s even difficult today.”

While Alex and Jamie grew up learning to swim, doing karate and riding horseback, they have always seemed ambivalent to the hobbies. But everything changed when they started running.

“[They were] smiling a lot, jumping up and down, [they] just seemed really at peace and just a different kind of happiness,” Robyn explained. “They seem to be eager to go when we tell them we’re going running. We just saw something different in them – something light up. It was really wonderful for us because we had never seen that before.”

Since then, becoming strong runners has been a family effort.

Robyn and her husband are in charge of their diets, she explained, and she tries to make sure her sons are eating healthy to stay in shape.

In terms of training, Robyn explained her sons have a different threshold for pain and can’t express themselves when they’re injured.

“Alex was running with his cross-country team in high school with his coach and we didn’t realize it but he had a stress fracture and the only way we knew that was he was running down a hill and he was limping,” she recalled. “It’s a lot of observation for us and just a lot of carefully building up the mileage. And we make sure all their workouts are followed by recovery runs.”

Neither Jamie nor Alex can run alone. Some days they run with a coach, and other days, their parents will run or bike alongside them.

Alex is now preparing to run in the New York City Marathon accompanied by a coach, and Jamie is looking forward to cheering his brother on.

“It’s very heartwarming and there aren’t many things that we can really rejoice about, having two very severe kids with autism,” Robyn explained. “So the whole running experience gives us that opportunity to rejoice and celebrate.”

RELATED STORIES

Stray Dog Runs Half-Marathon and Is Awarded a Medal While in the Pound

Son Surprises Biological Mom at Pittsburgh Half Marathon in Emotional Moment

Man Runs Entire L.A. Marathon Backwards to Raise Money for Epilepsy Research

0 comments on “New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons”

New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons

Autism doesn’t slow these identical twins down, especially when it comes to running. 

Alex and Jamie, 28, of Great Neck, New York, love nothing more than running marathons. 

After they realized their passion at 15 years old, their parents Robyn and Allen Schneider have always encouraged the hobby. 

Alex grew to be a competitive runner, training six days a week and completing half-marathons at an average of an hour and 16 minutes – an incredibly impressive time even for able-bodied competitive runners.

“It was just beyond words,” their mom Robyn told InsideEdition.com. “We were so excited, so thrilled for him, and he has no idea how great he is.”

For Jamie, the pastime is more recreational. He trains three days a week and prefers leisurely runs with his parents.

“He’s much more social,” his mom said. “He likes to stop and take a break, take a water stop, walk a little. He listens to an iPod when he’s running and he likes running behind girls with ponytails. I think [he likes] the ‘swish, swish’ motion of the ponytail.”

But being a parent to the identical twins hasn’t always been so easy, Robyn said.

“Growing up, one was a little bit more difficult than the other,” Robyn explained. “It was kind of like a chain reaction and they had a lot of behaviors and it was really hard to communicate because neither of them are verbal.”

She said they were diagnosed at 21 months, and they continue to need help with day-to-day tasks, like remembering to eat, putting on a jacket in cold weather and crossing the street.

“Autism is a lifelong disability,” she said. “They’re still not communicative, so it’s even difficult today.”

While Alex and Jamie grew up learning to swim, doing karate and riding horseback, they have always seemed ambivalent to the hobbies. But everything changed when they started running.

“[They were] smiling a lot, jumping up and down, [they] just seemed really at peace and just a different kind of happiness,” Robyn explained. “They seem to be eager to go when we tell them we’re going running. We just saw something different in them – something light up. It was really wonderful for us because we had never seen that before.”

Since then, becoming strong runners has been a family effort.

Robyn and her husband are in charge of their diets, she explained, and she tries to make sure her sons are eating healthy to stay in shape.

In terms of training, Robyn explained her sons have a different threshold for pain and can’t express themselves when they’re injured.

“Alex was running with his cross-country team in high school with his coach and we didn’t realize it but he had a stress fracture and the only way we knew that was he was running down a hill and he was limping,” she recalled. “It’s a lot of observation for us and just a lot of carefully building up the mileage. And we make sure all their workouts are followed by recovery runs.”

Neither Jamie nor Alex can run alone. Some days they run with a coach, and other days, their parents will run or bike alongside them.

Alex is now preparing to run in the New York City Marathon accompanied by a coach, and Jamie is looking forward to cheering his brother on.

“It’s very heartwarming and there aren’t many things that we can really rejoice about, having two very severe kids with autism,” Robyn explained. “So the whole running experience gives us that opportunity to rejoice and celebrate.”

RELATED STORIES

Stray Dog Runs Half-Marathon and Is Awarded a Medal While in the Pound

Son Surprises Biological Mom at Pittsburgh Half Marathon in Emotional Moment

Man Runs Entire L.A. Marathon Backwards to Raise Money for Epilepsy Research

0 comments on “New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons”

New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons

Autism doesn’t slow these identical twins down, especially when it comes to running. 

Alex and Jamie, 28, of Great Neck, New York, love nothing more than running marathons. 

After they realized their passion at 15 years old, their parents Robyn and Allen Schneider have always encouraged the hobby. 

Alex grew to be a competitive runner, training six days a week and completing half-marathons at an average of an hour and 16 minutes – an incredibly impressive time even for able-bodied competitive runners.

“It was just beyond words,” their mom Robyn told InsideEdition.com. “We were so excited, so thrilled for him, and he has no idea how great he is.”

For Jamie, the pastime is more recreational. He trains three days a week and prefers leisurely runs with his parents.

“He’s much more social,” his mom said. “He likes to stop and take a break, take a water stop, walk a little. He listens to an iPod when he’s running and he likes running behind girls with ponytails. I think [he likes] the ‘swish, swish’ motion of the ponytail.”

But being a parent to the identical twins hasn’t always been so easy, Robyn said.

“Growing up, one was a little bit more difficult than the other,” Robyn explained. “It was kind of like a chain reaction and they had a lot of behaviors and it was really hard to communicate because neither of them are verbal.”

She said they were diagnosed at 21 months, and they continue to need help with day-to-day tasks, like remembering to eat, putting on a jacket in cold weather and crossing the street.

“Autism is a lifelong disability,” she said. “They’re still not communicative, so it’s even difficult today.”

While Alex and Jamie grew up learning to swim, doing karate and riding horseback, they have always seemed ambivalent to the hobbies. But everything changed when they started running.

“[They were] smiling a lot, jumping up and down, [they] just seemed really at peace and just a different kind of happiness,” Robyn explained. “They seem to be eager to go when we tell them we’re going running. We just saw something different in them – something light up. It was really wonderful for us because we had never seen that before.”

Since then, becoming strong runners has been a family effort.

Robyn and her husband are in charge of their diets, she explained, and she tries to make sure her sons are eating healthy to stay in shape.

In terms of training, Robyn explained her sons have a different threshold for pain and can’t express themselves when they’re injured.

“Alex was running with his cross-country team in high school with his coach and we didn’t realize it but he had a stress fracture and the only way we knew that was he was running down a hill and he was limping,” she recalled. “It’s a lot of observation for us and just a lot of carefully building up the mileage. And we make sure all their workouts are followed by recovery runs.”

Neither Jamie nor Alex can run alone. Some days they run with a coach, and other days, their parents will run or bike alongside them.

Alex is now preparing to run in the New York City Marathon accompanied by a coach, and Jamie is looking forward to cheering his brother on.

“It’s very heartwarming and there aren’t many things that we can really rejoice about, having two very severe kids with autism,” Robyn explained. “So the whole running experience gives us that opportunity to rejoice and celebrate.”

RELATED STORIES

Stray Dog Runs Half-Marathon and Is Awarded a Medal While in the Pound

Son Surprises Biological Mom at Pittsburgh Half Marathon in Emotional Moment

Man Runs Entire L.A. Marathon Backwards to Raise Money for Epilepsy Research

0 comments on “New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons”

New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons

Autism doesn’t slow these identical twins down, especially when it comes to running. 

Alex and Jamie, 28, of Great Neck, New York, love nothing more than running marathons. 

After they realized their passion at 15 years old, their parents Robyn and Allen Schneider have always encouraged the hobby. 

Alex grew to be a competitive runner, training six days a week and completing half-marathons at an average of an hour and 16 minutes – an incredibly impressive time even for able-bodied competitive runners.

“It was just beyond words,” their mom Robyn told InsideEdition.com. “We were so excited, so thrilled for him, and he has no idea how great he is.”

For Jamie, the pastime is more recreational. He trains three days a week and prefers leisurely runs with his parents.

“He’s much more social,” his mom said. “He likes to stop and take a break, take a water stop, walk a little. He listens to an iPod when he’s running and he likes running behind girls with ponytails. I think [he likes] the ‘swish, swish’ motion of the ponytail.”

But being a parent to the identical twins hasn’t always been so easy, Robyn said.

“Growing up, one was a little bit more difficult than the other,” Robyn explained. “It was kind of like a chain reaction and they had a lot of behaviors and it was really hard to communicate because neither of them are verbal.”

She said they were diagnosed at 21 months, and they continue to need help with day-to-day tasks, like remembering to eat, putting on a jacket in cold weather and crossing the street.

“Autism is a lifelong disability,” she said. “They’re still not communicative, so it’s even difficult today.”

While Alex and Jamie grew up learning to swim, doing karate and riding horseback, they have always seemed ambivalent to the hobbies. But everything changed when they started running.

“[They were] smiling a lot, jumping up and down, [they] just seemed really at peace and just a different kind of happiness,” Robyn explained. “They seem to be eager to go when we tell them we’re going running. We just saw something different in them – something light up. It was really wonderful for us because we had never seen that before.”

Since then, becoming strong runners has been a family effort.

Robyn and her husband are in charge of their diets, she explained, and she tries to make sure her sons are eating healthy to stay in shape.

In terms of training, Robyn explained her sons have a different threshold for pain and can’t express themselves when they’re injured.

“Alex was running with his cross-country team in high school with his coach and we didn’t realize it but he had a stress fracture and the only way we knew that was he was running down a hill and he was limping,” she recalled. “It’s a lot of observation for us and just a lot of carefully building up the mileage. And we make sure all their workouts are followed by recovery runs.”

Neither Jamie nor Alex can run alone. Some days they run with a coach, and other days, their parents will run or bike alongside them.

Alex is now preparing to run in the New York City Marathon accompanied by a coach, and Jamie is looking forward to cheering his brother on.

“It’s very heartwarming and there aren’t many things that we can really rejoice about, having two very severe kids with autism,” Robyn explained. “So the whole running experience gives us that opportunity to rejoice and celebrate.”

RELATED STORIES

Stray Dog Runs Half-Marathon and Is Awarded a Medal While in the Pound

Son Surprises Biological Mom at Pittsburgh Half Marathon in Emotional Moment

Man Runs Entire L.A. Marathon Backwards to Raise Money for Epilepsy Research

0 comments on “New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons”

New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons

Autism doesn’t slow these identical twins down, especially when it comes to running. 

Alex and Jamie, 28, of Great Neck, New York, love nothing more than running marathons. 

After they realized their passion at 15 years old, their parents Robyn and Allen Schneider have always encouraged the hobby. 

Alex grew to be a competitive runner, training six days a week and completing half-marathons at an average of an hour and 16 minutes – an incredibly impressive time even for able-bodied competitive runners.

“It was just beyond words,” their mom Robyn told InsideEdition.com. “We were so excited, so thrilled for him, and he has no idea how great he is.”

For Jamie, the pastime is more recreational. He trains three days a week and prefers leisurely runs with his parents.

“He’s much more social,” his mom said. “He likes to stop and take a break, take a water stop, walk a little. He listens to an iPod when he’s running and he likes running behind girls with ponytails. I think [he likes] the ‘swish, swish’ motion of the ponytail.”

But being a parent to the identical twins hasn’t always been so easy, Robyn said.

“Growing up, one was a little bit more difficult than the other,” Robyn explained. “It was kind of like a chain reaction and they had a lot of behaviors and it was really hard to communicate because neither of them are verbal.”

She said they were diagnosed at 21 months, and they continue to need help with day-to-day tasks, like remembering to eat, putting on a jacket in cold weather and crossing the street.

“Autism is a lifelong disability,” she said. “They’re still not communicative, so it’s even difficult today.”

While Alex and Jamie grew up learning to swim, doing karate and riding horseback, they have always seemed ambivalent to the hobbies. But everything changed when they started running.

“[They were] smiling a lot, jumping up and down, [they] just seemed really at peace and just a different kind of happiness,” Robyn explained. “They seem to be eager to go when we tell them we’re going running. We just saw something different in them – something light up. It was really wonderful for us because we had never seen that before.”

Since then, becoming strong runners has been a family effort.

Robyn and her husband are in charge of their diets, she explained, and she tries to make sure her sons are eating healthy to stay in shape.

In terms of training, Robyn explained her sons have a different threshold for pain and can’t express themselves when they’re injured.

“Alex was running with his cross-country team in high school with his coach and we didn’t realize it but he had a stress fracture and the only way we knew that was he was running down a hill and he was limping,” she recalled. “It’s a lot of observation for us and just a lot of carefully building up the mileage. And we make sure all their workouts are followed by recovery runs.”

Neither Jamie nor Alex can run alone. Some days they run with a coach, and other days, their parents will run or bike alongside them.

Alex is now preparing to run in the New York City Marathon accompanied by a coach, and Jamie is looking forward to cheering his brother on.

“It’s very heartwarming and there aren’t many things that we can really rejoice about, having two very severe kids with autism,” Robyn explained. “So the whole running experience gives us that opportunity to rejoice and celebrate.”

RELATED STORIES

Stray Dog Runs Half-Marathon and Is Awarded a Medal While in the Pound

Son Surprises Biological Mom at Pittsburgh Half Marathon in Emotional Moment

Man Runs Entire L.A. Marathon Backwards to Raise Money for Epilepsy Research

0 comments on “New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons”

New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons

Autism doesn’t slow these identical twins down, especially when it comes to running. 

Alex and Jamie, 28, of Great Neck, New York, love nothing more than running marathons. 

After they realized their passion at 15 years old, their parents Robyn and Allen Schneider have always encouraged the hobby. 

Alex grew to be a competitive runner, training six days a week and completing half-marathons at an average of an hour and 16 minutes – an incredibly impressive time even for able-bodied competitive runners.

“It was just beyond words,” their mom Robyn told InsideEdition.com. “We were so excited, so thrilled for him, and he has no idea how great he is.”

For Jamie, the pastime is more recreational. He trains three days a week and prefers leisurely runs with his parents.

“He’s much more social,” his mom said. “He likes to stop and take a break, take a water stop, walk a little. He listens to an iPod when he’s running and he likes running behind girls with ponytails. I think [he likes] the ‘swish, swish’ motion of the ponytail.”

But being a parent to the identical twins hasn’t always been so easy, Robyn said.

“Growing up, one was a little bit more difficult than the other,” Robyn explained. “It was kind of like a chain reaction and they had a lot of behaviors and it was really hard to communicate because neither of them are verbal.”

She said they were diagnosed at 21 months, and they continue to need help with day-to-day tasks, like remembering to eat, putting on a jacket in cold weather and crossing the street.

“Autism is a lifelong disability,” she said. “They’re still not communicative, so it’s even difficult today.”

While Alex and Jamie grew up learning to swim, doing karate and riding horseback, they have always seemed ambivalent to the hobbies. But everything changed when they started running.

“[They were] smiling a lot, jumping up and down, [they] just seemed really at peace and just a different kind of happiness,” Robyn explained. “They seem to be eager to go when we tell them we’re going running. We just saw something different in them – something light up. It was really wonderful for us because we had never seen that before.”

Since then, becoming strong runners has been a family effort.

Robyn and her husband are in charge of their diets, she explained, and she tries to make sure her sons are eating healthy to stay in shape.

In terms of training, Robyn explained her sons have a different threshold for pain and can’t express themselves when they’re injured.

“Alex was running with his cross-country team in high school with his coach and we didn’t realize it but he had a stress fracture and the only way we knew that was he was running down a hill and he was limping,” she recalled. “It’s a lot of observation for us and just a lot of carefully building up the mileage. And we make sure all their workouts are followed by recovery runs.”

Neither Jamie nor Alex can run alone. Some days they run with a coach, and other days, their parents will run or bike alongside them.

Alex is now preparing to run in the New York City Marathon accompanied by a coach, and Jamie is looking forward to cheering his brother on.

“It’s very heartwarming and there aren’t many things that we can really rejoice about, having two very severe kids with autism,” Robyn explained. “So the whole running experience gives us that opportunity to rejoice and celebrate.”

RELATED STORIES

Stray Dog Runs Half-Marathon and Is Awarded a Medal While in the Pound

Son Surprises Biological Mom at Pittsburgh Half Marathon in Emotional Moment

Man Runs Entire L.A. Marathon Backwards to Raise Money for Epilepsy Research

0 comments on “New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons”

New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons

Autism doesn’t slow these identical twins down, especially when it comes to running. 

Alex and Jamie, 28, of Great Neck, New York, love nothing more than running marathons. 

After they realized their passion at 15 years old, their parents Robyn and Allen Schneider have always encouraged the hobby. 

Alex grew to be a competitive runner, training six days a week and completing half-marathons at an average of an hour and 16 minutes – an incredibly impressive time even for able-bodied competitive runners.

“It was just beyond words,” their mom Robyn told InsideEdition.com. “We were so excited, so thrilled for him, and he has no idea how great he is.”

For Jamie, the pastime is more recreational. He trains three days a week and prefers leisurely runs with his parents.

“He’s much more social,” his mom said. “He likes to stop and take a break, take a water stop, walk a little. He listens to an iPod when he’s running and he likes running behind girls with ponytails. I think [he likes] the ‘swish, swish’ motion of the ponytail.”

But being a parent to the identical twins hasn’t always been so easy, Robyn said.

“Growing up, one was a little bit more difficult than the other,” Robyn explained. “It was kind of like a chain reaction and they had a lot of behaviors and it was really hard to communicate because neither of them are verbal.”

She said they were diagnosed at 21 months, and they continue to need help with day-to-day tasks, like remembering to eat, putting on a jacket in cold weather and crossing the street.

“Autism is a lifelong disability,” she said. “They’re still not communicative, so it’s even difficult today.”

While Alex and Jamie grew up learning to swim, doing karate and riding horseback, they have always seemed ambivalent to the hobbies. But everything changed when they started running.

“[They were] smiling a lot, jumping up and down, [they] just seemed really at peace and just a different kind of happiness,” Robyn explained. “They seem to be eager to go when we tell them we’re going running. We just saw something different in them – something light up. It was really wonderful for us because we had never seen that before.”

Since then, becoming strong runners has been a family effort.

Robyn and her husband are in charge of their diets, she explained, and she tries to make sure her sons are eating healthy to stay in shape.

In terms of training, Robyn explained her sons have a different threshold for pain and can’t express themselves when they’re injured.

“Alex was running with his cross-country team in high school with his coach and we didn’t realize it but he had a stress fracture and the only way we knew that was he was running down a hill and he was limping,” she recalled. “It’s a lot of observation for us and just a lot of carefully building up the mileage. And we make sure all their workouts are followed by recovery runs.”

Neither Jamie nor Alex can run alone. Some days they run with a coach, and other days, their parents will run or bike alongside them.

Alex is now preparing to run in the New York City Marathon accompanied by a coach, and Jamie is looking forward to cheering his brother on.

“It’s very heartwarming and there aren’t many things that we can really rejoice about, having two very severe kids with autism,” Robyn explained. “So the whole running experience gives us that opportunity to rejoice and celebrate.”

RELATED STORIES

Stray Dog Runs Half-Marathon and Is Awarded a Medal While in the Pound

Son Surprises Biological Mom at Pittsburgh Half Marathon in Emotional Moment

Man Runs Entire L.A. Marathon Backwards to Raise Money for Epilepsy Research

0 comments on “New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons”

New York Twin Brothers With Autism Love Running Marathons

Autism doesn’t slow these identical twins down, especially when it comes to running. 

Alex and Jamie, 28, of Great Neck, New York, love nothing more than running marathons. 

After they realized their passion at 15 years old, their parents Robyn and Allen Schneider have always encouraged the hobby. 

Alex grew to be a competitive runner, training six days a week and completing half-marathons at an average of an hour and 16 minutes – an incredibly impressive time even for able-bodied competitive runners.

“It was just beyond words,” their mom Robyn told InsideEdition.com. “We were so excited, so thrilled for him, and he has no idea how great he is.”

For Jamie, the pastime is more recreational. He trains three days a week and prefers leisurely runs with his parents.

“He’s much more social,” his mom said. “He likes to stop and take a break, take a water stop, walk a little. He listens to an iPod when he’s running and he likes running behind girls with ponytails. I think [he likes] the ‘swish, swish’ motion of the ponytail.”

But being a parent to the identical twins hasn’t always been so easy, Robyn said.

“Growing up, one was a little bit more difficult than the other,” Robyn explained. “It was kind of like a chain reaction and they had a lot of behaviors and it was really hard to communicate because neither of them are verbal.”

She said they were diagnosed at 21 months, and they continue to need help with day-to-day tasks, like remembering to eat, putting on a jacket in cold weather and crossing the street.

“Autism is a lifelong disability,” she said. “They’re still not communicative, so it’s even difficult today.”

While Alex and Jamie grew up learning to swim, doing karate and riding horseback, they have always seemed ambivalent to the hobbies. But everything changed when they started running.

“[They were] smiling a lot, jumping up and down, [they] just seemed really at peace and just a different kind of happiness,” Robyn explained. “They seem to be eager to go when we tell them we’re going running. We just saw something different in them – something light up. It was really wonderful for us because we had never seen that before.”

Since then, becoming strong runners has been a family effort.

Robyn and her husband are in charge of their diets, she explained, and she tries to make sure her sons are eating healthy to stay in shape.

In terms of training, Robyn explained her sons have a different threshold for pain and can’t express themselves when they’re injured.

“Alex was running with his cross-country team in high school with his coach and we didn’t realize it but he had a stress fracture and the only way we knew that was he was running down a hill and he was limping,” she recalled. “It’s a lot of observation for us and just a lot of carefully building up the mileage. And we make sure all their workouts are followed by recovery runs.”

Neither Jamie nor Alex can run alone. Some days they run with a coach, and other days, their parents will run or bike alongside them.

Alex is now preparing to run in the New York City Marathon accompanied by a coach, and Jamie is looking forward to cheering his brother on.

“It’s very heartwarming and there aren’t many things that we can really rejoice about, having two very severe kids with autism,” Robyn explained. “So the whole running experience gives us that opportunity to rejoice and celebrate.”

RELATED STORIES

Stray Dog Runs Half-Marathon and Is Awarded a Medal While in the Pound

Son Surprises Biological Mom at Pittsburgh Half Marathon in Emotional Moment

Man Runs Entire L.A. Marathon Backwards to Raise Money for Epilepsy Research

0 comments on “Kennedy Center holds weekend events for Autism Project”

Kennedy Center holds weekend events for Autism Project

The Kennedy Center Food, Wine & BrewFest will be held on Saturday, Sept. 15, from 6-10 p.m., at the Fairfield Museum and History Center, 370 Beach Road. The Kennedy Center Autism SpectRUN will take place the following day on Sunday, Sept. 16, at 9 a.m., at Jennings Beach, 800 S. Benson Road. Both events will benefit The Kennedy Center Autism Project.

On Saturday, there will be local samplings with food trucks from Brick & Wood Pizza, Taco Loco & Super Duper Weenie, and local breweries including Two Roads, Half Full, Aspetuck Brew Lab, Fairfield Craft Ales & Athletic Brewing. Local sounds from Merwin Mountain Band. Tickets are $75 per person.

On Sunday, the 5K Run/Walk and Mile Stroll kicks off at 9 a.m., with registration at 7:30 a.m. and closing at 8:30 a.m. Participants are encouraged to wear colorful attire and decorate their strollers or wagons.

The 5K Run/Walk and Mile Stroll includes two designated routes: 5K Timed Race and 1 Mile Walk/Stroll, both starting at 9 a.m. Earlier, there are two non-competitive Kids Races: Kids 100 Yard Dash for children 7 and under at 8:25 a.m. and Kids ¼ Mile Run for children 8-16 years of age at 8:30 a.m. In addition, Parking Lot Zumba will get you warmed up at 8:45 a.m.

Enjoy the following family activities: Casey Carl’s Bubblemania, Bounce House, face painting, sensory tents, games, entertainment and food trucks. The SpectRUN is an Autism Sensory Friendly Event.

Prizes awarded for Most Colorful child, adult & team, Most Dollars Raised — individual and team, and for the timed race — Male & Female Champions, plus Top Finishers in 8 age groups.

Online registration is open until Sept. 14 at 4 p.m. or register at the event, which takes place rain or shine. Participants also may register on Saturday, Sept. 15 at SoundRunner in Fairfield during early pickup from 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

The participation fee is $30/adult, $15/children 18 and under, and children 5 and under are free.

For information, visit KC-Autism.org to register online at the Food, Wine and Brewfest tab or call The Kennedy Center at 203-365-8522, ext. 213.

0 comments on “Kennedy Center holds weekend events for Autism Project”

Kennedy Center holds weekend events for Autism Project

The Kennedy Center Food, Wine & BrewFest will be held on Saturday, Sept. 15, from 6-10 p.m., at the Fairfield Museum and History Center, 370 Beach Road. The Kennedy Center Autism SpectRUN will take place the following day on Sunday, Sept. 16, at 9 a.m., at Jennings Beach, 800 S. Benson Road. Both events will benefit The Kennedy Center Autism Project.

On Saturday, there will be local samplings with food trucks from Brick & Wood Pizza, Taco Loco & Super Duper Weenie, and local breweries including Two Roads, Half Full, Aspetuck Brew Lab, Fairfield Craft Ales & Athletic Brewing. Local sounds from Merwin Mountain Band. Tickets are $75 per person.

On Sunday, the 5K Run/Walk and Mile Stroll kicks off at 9 a.m., with registration at 7:30 a.m. and closing at 8:30 a.m. Participants are encouraged to wear colorful attire and decorate their strollers or wagons.

The 5K Run/Walk and Mile Stroll includes two designated routes: 5K Timed Race and 1 Mile Walk/Stroll, both starting at 9 a.m. Earlier, there are two non-competitive Kids Races: Kids 100 Yard Dash for children 7 and under at 8:25 a.m. and Kids ¼ Mile Run for children 8-16 years of age at 8:30 a.m. In addition, Parking Lot Zumba will get you warmed up at 8:45 a.m.

Enjoy the following family activities: Casey Carl’s Bubblemania, Bounce House, face painting, sensory tents, games, entertainment and food trucks. The SpectRUN is an Autism Sensory Friendly Event.

Prizes awarded for Most Colorful child, adult & team, Most Dollars Raised — individual and team, and for the timed race — Male & Female Champions, plus Top Finishers in 8 age groups.

Online registration is open until Sept. 14 at 4 p.m. or register at the event, which takes place rain or shine. Participants also may register on Saturday, Sept. 15 at SoundRunner in Fairfield during early pickup from 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

The participation fee is $30/adult, $15/children 18 and under, and children 5 and under are free.

For information, visit KC-Autism.org to register online at the Food, Wine and Brewfest tab or call The Kennedy Center at 203-365-8522, ext. 213.

0 comments on “Kennedy Center holds weekend events for Autism Project”

Kennedy Center holds weekend events for Autism Project

The Kennedy Center Food, Wine & BrewFest will be held on Saturday, Sept. 15, from 6-10 p.m., at the Fairfield Museum and History Center, 370 Beach Road. The Kennedy Center Autism SpectRUN will take place the following day on Sunday, Sept. 16, at 9 a.m., at Jennings Beach, 800 S. Benson Road. Both events will benefit The Kennedy Center Autism Project.

On Saturday, there will be local samplings with food trucks from Brick & Wood Pizza, Taco Loco & Super Duper Weenie, and local breweries including Two Roads, Half Full, Aspetuck Brew Lab, Fairfield Craft Ales & Athletic Brewing. Local sounds from Merwin Mountain Band. Tickets are $75 per person.

On Sunday, the 5K Run/Walk and Mile Stroll kicks off at 9 a.m., with registration at 7:30 a.m. and closing at 8:30 a.m. Participants are encouraged to wear colorful attire and decorate their strollers or wagons.

The 5K Run/Walk and Mile Stroll includes two designated routes: 5K Timed Race and 1 Mile Walk/Stroll, both starting at 9 a.m. Earlier, there are two non-competitive Kids Races: Kids 100 Yard Dash for children 7 and under at 8:25 a.m. and Kids ¼ Mile Run for children 8-16 years of age at 8:30 a.m. In addition, Parking Lot Zumba will get you warmed up at 8:45 a.m.

Enjoy the following family activities: Casey Carl’s Bubblemania, Bounce House, face painting, sensory tents, games, entertainment and food trucks. The SpectRUN is an Autism Sensory Friendly Event.

Prizes awarded for Most Colorful child, adult & team, Most Dollars Raised — individual and team, and for the timed race — Male & Female Champions, plus Top Finishers in 8 age groups.

Online registration is open until Sept. 14 at 4 p.m. or register at the event, which takes place rain or shine. Participants also may register on Saturday, Sept. 15 at SoundRunner in Fairfield during early pickup from 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

The participation fee is $30/adult, $15/children 18 and under, and children 5 and under are free.

For information, visit KC-Autism.org to register online at the Food, Wine and Brewfest tab or call The Kennedy Center at 203-365-8522, ext. 213.

0 comments on “Kennedy Center holds weekend events for Autism Project”

Kennedy Center holds weekend events for Autism Project

The Kennedy Center Food, Wine & BrewFest will be held on Saturday, Sept. 15, from 6-10 p.m., at the Fairfield Museum and History Center, 370 Beach Road. The Kennedy Center Autism SpectRUN will take place the following day on Sunday, Sept. 16, at 9 a.m., at Jennings Beach, 800 S. Benson Road. Both events will benefit The Kennedy Center Autism Project.

On Saturday, there will be local samplings with food trucks from Brick & Wood Pizza, Taco Loco & Super Duper Weenie, and local breweries including Two Roads, Half Full, Aspetuck Brew Lab, Fairfield Craft Ales & Athletic Brewing. Local sounds from Merwin Mountain Band. Tickets are $75 per person.

On Sunday, the 5K Run/Walk and Mile Stroll kicks off at 9 a.m., with registration at 7:30 a.m. and closing at 8:30 a.m. Participants are encouraged to wear colorful attire and decorate their strollers or wagons.

The 5K Run/Walk and Mile Stroll includes two designated routes: 5K Timed Race and 1 Mile Walk/Stroll, both starting at 9 a.m. Earlier, there are two non-competitive Kids Races: Kids 100 Yard Dash for children 7 and under at 8:25 a.m. and Kids ¼ Mile Run for children 8-16 years of age at 8:30 a.m. In addition, Parking Lot Zumba will get you warmed up at 8:45 a.m.

Enjoy the following family activities: Casey Carl’s Bubblemania, Bounce House, face painting, sensory tents, games, entertainment and food trucks. The SpectRUN is an Autism Sensory Friendly Event.

Prizes awarded for Most Colorful child, adult & team, Most Dollars Raised — individual and team, and for the timed race — Male & Female Champions, plus Top Finishers in 8 age groups.

Online registration is open until Sept. 14 at 4 p.m. or register at the event, which takes place rain or shine. Participants also may register on Saturday, Sept. 15 at SoundRunner in Fairfield during early pickup from 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

The participation fee is $30/adult, $15/children 18 and under, and children 5 and under are free.

For information, visit KC-Autism.org to register online at the Food, Wine and Brewfest tab or call The Kennedy Center at 203-365-8522, ext. 213.

0 comments on “Kennedy Center holds weekend events for Autism Project”

Kennedy Center holds weekend events for Autism Project

The Kennedy Center Food, Wine & BrewFest will be held on Saturday, Sept. 15, from 6-10 p.m., at the Fairfield Museum and History Center, 370 Beach Road. The Kennedy Center Autism SpectRUN will take place the following day on Sunday, Sept. 16, at 9 a.m., at Jennings Beach, 800 S. Benson Road. Both events will benefit The Kennedy Center Autism Project.

On Saturday, there will be local samplings with food trucks from Brick & Wood Pizza, Taco Loco & Super Duper Weenie, and local breweries including Two Roads, Half Full, Aspetuck Brew Lab, Fairfield Craft Ales & Athletic Brewing. Local sounds from Merwin Mountain Band. Tickets are $75 per person.

On Sunday, the 5K Run/Walk and Mile Stroll kicks off at 9 a.m., with registration at 7:30 a.m. and closing at 8:30 a.m. Participants are encouraged to wear colorful attire and decorate their strollers or wagons.

The 5K Run/Walk and Mile Stroll includes two designated routes: 5K Timed Race and 1 Mile Walk/Stroll, both starting at 9 a.m. Earlier, there are two non-competitive Kids Races: Kids 100 Yard Dash for children 7 and under at 8:25 a.m. and Kids ¼ Mile Run for children 8-16 years of age at 8:30 a.m. In addition, Parking Lot Zumba will get you warmed up at 8:45 a.m.

Enjoy the following family activities: Casey Carl’s Bubblemania, Bounce House, face painting, sensory tents, games, entertainment and food trucks. The SpectRUN is an Autism Sensory Friendly Event.

Prizes awarded for Most Colorful child, adult & team, Most Dollars Raised — individual and team, and for the timed race — Male & Female Champions, plus Top Finishers in 8 age groups.

Online registration is open until Sept. 14 at 4 p.m. or register at the event, which takes place rain or shine. Participants also may register on Saturday, Sept. 15 at SoundRunner in Fairfield during early pickup from 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

The participation fee is $30/adult, $15/children 18 and under, and children 5 and under are free.

For information, visit KC-Autism.org to register online at the Food, Wine and Brewfest tab or call The Kennedy Center at 203-365-8522, ext. 213.

0 comments on “Kennedy Center holds weekend events for Autism Project”

Kennedy Center holds weekend events for Autism Project

The Kennedy Center Food, Wine & BrewFest will be held on Saturday, Sept. 15, from 6-10 p.m., at the Fairfield Museum and History Center, 370 Beach Road. The Kennedy Center Autism SpectRUN will take place the following day on Sunday, Sept. 16, at 9 a.m., at Jennings Beach, 800 S. Benson Road. Both events will benefit The Kennedy Center Autism Project.

On Saturday, there will be local samplings with food trucks from Brick & Wood Pizza, Taco Loco & Super Duper Weenie, and local breweries including Two Roads, Half Full, Aspetuck Brew Lab, Fairfield Craft Ales & Athletic Brewing. Local sounds from Merwin Mountain Band. Tickets are $75 per person.

On Sunday, the 5K Run/Walk and Mile Stroll kicks off at 9 a.m., with registration at 7:30 a.m. and closing at 8:30 a.m. Participants are encouraged to wear colorful attire and decorate their strollers or wagons.

The 5K Run/Walk and Mile Stroll includes two designated routes: 5K Timed Race and 1 Mile Walk/Stroll, both starting at 9 a.m. Earlier, there are two non-competitive Kids Races: Kids 100 Yard Dash for children 7 and under at 8:25 a.m. and Kids ¼ Mile Run for children 8-16 years of age at 8:30 a.m. In addition, Parking Lot Zumba will get you warmed up at 8:45 a.m.

Enjoy the following family activities: Casey Carl’s Bubblemania, Bounce House, face painting, sensory tents, games, entertainment and food trucks. The SpectRUN is an Autism Sensory Friendly Event.

Prizes awarded for Most Colorful child, adult & team, Most Dollars Raised — individual and team, and for the timed race — Male & Female Champions, plus Top Finishers in 8 age groups.

Online registration is open until Sept. 14 at 4 p.m. or register at the event, which takes place rain or shine. Participants also may register on Saturday, Sept. 15 at SoundRunner in Fairfield during early pickup from 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

The participation fee is $30/adult, $15/children 18 and under, and children 5 and under are free.

For information, visit KC-Autism.org to register online at the Food, Wine and Brewfest tab or call The Kennedy Center at 203-365-8522, ext. 213.

0 comments on “Kennedy Center holds weekend events for Autism Project”

Kennedy Center holds weekend events for Autism Project

The Kennedy Center Food, Wine & BrewFest will be held on Saturday, Sept. 15, from 6-10 p.m., at the Fairfield Museum and History Center, 370 Beach Road. The Kennedy Center Autism SpectRUN will take place the following day on Sunday, Sept. 16, at 9 a.m., at Jennings Beach, 800 S. Benson Road. Both events will benefit The Kennedy Center Autism Project.

On Saturday, there will be local samplings with food trucks from Brick & Wood Pizza, Taco Loco & Super Duper Weenie, and local breweries including Two Roads, Half Full, Aspetuck Brew Lab, Fairfield Craft Ales & Athletic Brewing. Local sounds from Merwin Mountain Band. Tickets are $75 per person.

On Sunday, the 5K Run/Walk and Mile Stroll kicks off at 9 a.m., with registration at 7:30 a.m. and closing at 8:30 a.m. Participants are encouraged to wear colorful attire and decorate their strollers or wagons.

The 5K Run/Walk and Mile Stroll includes two designated routes: 5K Timed Race and 1 Mile Walk/Stroll, both starting at 9 a.m. Earlier, there are two non-competitive Kids Races: Kids 100 Yard Dash for children 7 and under at 8:25 a.m. and Kids ¼ Mile Run for children 8-16 years of age at 8:30 a.m. In addition, Parking Lot Zumba will get you warmed up at 8:45 a.m.

Enjoy the following family activities: Casey Carl’s Bubblemania, Bounce House, face painting, sensory tents, games, entertainment and food trucks. The SpectRUN is an Autism Sensory Friendly Event.

Prizes awarded for Most Colorful child, adult & team, Most Dollars Raised — individual and team, and for the timed race — Male & Female Champions, plus Top Finishers in 8 age groups.

Online registration is open until Sept. 14 at 4 p.m. or register at the event, which takes place rain or shine. Participants also may register on Saturday, Sept. 15 at SoundRunner in Fairfield during early pickup from 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

The participation fee is $30/adult, $15/children 18 and under, and children 5 and under are free.

For information, visit KC-Autism.org to register online at the Food, Wine and Brewfest tab or call The Kennedy Center at 203-365-8522, ext. 213.

0 comments on “Kennedy Center holds weekend events for Autism Project”

Kennedy Center holds weekend events for Autism Project

The Kennedy Center Food, Wine & BrewFest will be held on Saturday, Sept. 15, from 6-10 p.m., at the Fairfield Museum and History Center, 370 Beach Road. The Kennedy Center Autism SpectRUN will take place the following day on Sunday, Sept. 16, at 9 a.m., at Jennings Beach, 800 S. Benson Road. Both events will benefit The Kennedy Center Autism Project.

On Saturday, there will be local samplings with food trucks from Brick & Wood Pizza, Taco Loco & Super Duper Weenie, and local breweries including Two Roads, Half Full, Aspetuck Brew Lab, Fairfield Craft Ales & Athletic Brewing. Local sounds from Merwin Mountain Band. Tickets are $75 per person.

On Sunday, the 5K Run/Walk and Mile Stroll kicks off at 9 a.m., with registration at 7:30 a.m. and closing at 8:30 a.m. Participants are encouraged to wear colorful attire and decorate their strollers or wagons.

The 5K Run/Walk and Mile Stroll includes two designated routes: 5K Timed Race and 1 Mile Walk/Stroll, both starting at 9 a.m. Earlier, there are two non-competitive Kids Races: Kids 100 Yard Dash for children 7 and under at 8:25 a.m. and Kids ¼ Mile Run for children 8-16 years of age at 8:30 a.m. In addition, Parking Lot Zumba will get you warmed up at 8:45 a.m.

Enjoy the following family activities: Casey Carl’s Bubblemania, Bounce House, face painting, sensory tents, games, entertainment and food trucks. The SpectRUN is an Autism Sensory Friendly Event.

Prizes awarded for Most Colorful child, adult & team, Most Dollars Raised — individual and team, and for the timed race — Male & Female Champions, plus Top Finishers in 8 age groups.

Online registration is open until Sept. 14 at 4 p.m. or register at the event, which takes place rain or shine. Participants also may register on Saturday, Sept. 15 at SoundRunner in Fairfield during early pickup from 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

The participation fee is $30/adult, $15/children 18 and under, and children 5 and under are free.

For information, visit KC-Autism.org to register online at the Food, Wine and Brewfest tab or call The Kennedy Center at 203-365-8522, ext. 213.

0 comments on “Kennedy Center holds weekend events for Autism Project”

Kennedy Center holds weekend events for Autism Project

The Kennedy Center Food, Wine & BrewFest will be held on Saturday, Sept. 15, from 6-10 p.m., at the Fairfield Museum and History Center, 370 Beach Road. The Kennedy Center Autism SpectRUN will take place the following day on Sunday, Sept. 16, at 9 a.m., at Jennings Beach, 800 S. Benson Road. Both events will benefit The Kennedy Center Autism Project.

On Saturday, there will be local samplings with food trucks from Brick & Wood Pizza, Taco Loco & Super Duper Weenie, and local breweries including Two Roads, Half Full, Aspetuck Brew Lab, Fairfield Craft Ales & Athletic Brewing. Local sounds from Merwin Mountain Band. Tickets are $75 per person.

On Sunday, the 5K Run/Walk and Mile Stroll kicks off at 9 a.m., with registration at 7:30 a.m. and closing at 8:30 a.m. Participants are encouraged to wear colorful attire and decorate their strollers or wagons.

The 5K Run/Walk and Mile Stroll includes two designated routes: 5K Timed Race and 1 Mile Walk/Stroll, both starting at 9 a.m. Earlier, there are two non-competitive Kids Races: Kids 100 Yard Dash for children 7 and under at 8:25 a.m. and Kids ¼ Mile Run for children 8-16 years of age at 8:30 a.m. In addition, Parking Lot Zumba will get you warmed up at 8:45 a.m.

Enjoy the following family activities: Casey Carl’s Bubblemania, Bounce House, face painting, sensory tents, games, entertainment and food trucks. The SpectRUN is an Autism Sensory Friendly Event.

Prizes awarded for Most Colorful child, adult & team, Most Dollars Raised — individual and team, and for the timed race — Male & Female Champions, plus Top Finishers in 8 age groups.

Online registration is open until Sept. 14 at 4 p.m. or register at the event, which takes place rain or shine. Participants also may register on Saturday, Sept. 15 at SoundRunner in Fairfield during early pickup from 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

The participation fee is $30/adult, $15/children 18 and under, and children 5 and under are free.

For information, visit KC-Autism.org to register online at the Food, Wine and Brewfest tab or call The Kennedy Center at 203-365-8522, ext. 213.

0 comments on “Kennedy Center holds weekend events for Autism Project”

Kennedy Center holds weekend events for Autism Project

The Kennedy Center Food, Wine & BrewFest will be held on Saturday, Sept. 15, from 6-10 p.m., at the Fairfield Museum and History Center, 370 Beach Road. The Kennedy Center Autism SpectRUN will take place the following day on Sunday, Sept. 16, at 9 a.m., at Jennings Beach, 800 S. Benson Road. Both events will benefit The Kennedy Center Autism Project.

On Saturday, there will be local samplings with food trucks from Brick & Wood Pizza, Taco Loco & Super Duper Weenie, and local breweries including Two Roads, Half Full, Aspetuck Brew Lab, Fairfield Craft Ales & Athletic Brewing. Local sounds from Merwin Mountain Band. Tickets are $75 per person.

On Sunday, the 5K Run/Walk and Mile Stroll kicks off at 9 a.m., with registration at 7:30 a.m. and closing at 8:30 a.m. Participants are encouraged to wear colorful attire and decorate their strollers or wagons.

The 5K Run/Walk and Mile Stroll includes two designated routes: 5K Timed Race and 1 Mile Walk/Stroll, both starting at 9 a.m. Earlier, there are two non-competitive Kids Races: Kids 100 Yard Dash for children 7 and under at 8:25 a.m. and Kids ¼ Mile Run for children 8-16 years of age at 8:30 a.m. In addition, Parking Lot Zumba will get you warmed up at 8:45 a.m.

Enjoy the following family activities: Casey Carl’s Bubblemania, Bounce House, face painting, sensory tents, games, entertainment and food trucks. The SpectRUN is an Autism Sensory Friendly Event.

Prizes awarded for Most Colorful child, adult & team, Most Dollars Raised — individual and team, and for the timed race — Male & Female Champions, plus Top Finishers in 8 age groups.

Online registration is open until Sept. 14 at 4 p.m. or register at the event, which takes place rain or shine. Participants also may register on Saturday, Sept. 15 at SoundRunner in Fairfield during early pickup from 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

The participation fee is $30/adult, $15/children 18 and under, and children 5 and under are free.

For information, visit KC-Autism.org to register online at the Food, Wine and Brewfest tab or call The Kennedy Center at 203-365-8522, ext. 213.

0 comments on “Kennedy Center holds weekend events for Autism Project”

Kennedy Center holds weekend events for Autism Project

The Kennedy Center Food, Wine & BrewFest will be held on Saturday, Sept. 15, from 6-10 p.m., at the Fairfield Museum and History Center, 370 Beach Road. The Kennedy Center Autism SpectRUN will take place the following day on Sunday, Sept. 16, at 9 a.m., at Jennings Beach, 800 S. Benson Road. Both events will benefit The Kennedy Center Autism Project.

On Saturday, there will be local samplings with food trucks from Brick & Wood Pizza, Taco Loco & Super Duper Weenie, and local breweries including Two Roads, Half Full, Aspetuck Brew Lab, Fairfield Craft Ales & Athletic Brewing. Local sounds from Merwin Mountain Band. Tickets are $75 per person.

On Sunday, the 5K Run/Walk and Mile Stroll kicks off at 9 a.m., with registration at 7:30 a.m. and closing at 8:30 a.m. Participants are encouraged to wear colorful attire and decorate their strollers or wagons.

The 5K Run/Walk and Mile Stroll includes two designated routes: 5K Timed Race and 1 Mile Walk/Stroll, both starting at 9 a.m. Earlier, there are two non-competitive Kids Races: Kids 100 Yard Dash for children 7 and under at 8:25 a.m. and Kids ¼ Mile Run for children 8-16 years of age at 8:30 a.m. In addition, Parking Lot Zumba will get you warmed up at 8:45 a.m.

Enjoy the following family activities: Casey Carl’s Bubblemania, Bounce House, face painting, sensory tents, games, entertainment and food trucks. The SpectRUN is an Autism Sensory Friendly Event.

Prizes awarded for Most Colorful child, adult & team, Most Dollars Raised — individual and team, and for the timed race — Male & Female Champions, plus Top Finishers in 8 age groups.

Online registration is open until Sept. 14 at 4 p.m. or register at the event, which takes place rain or shine. Participants also may register on Saturday, Sept. 15 at SoundRunner in Fairfield during early pickup from 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

The participation fee is $30/adult, $15/children 18 and under, and children 5 and under are free.

For information, visit KC-Autism.org to register online at the Food, Wine and Brewfest tab or call The Kennedy Center at 203-365-8522, ext. 213.

0 comments on “Teen with autism missing from Clayton County”

Teen with autism missing from Clayton County

RIVERDALE, Ga. — A 13-year-old girl with autism was reported missing from her Clayton County home Saturday night.

Law enforcement officials said Bukola Mayomi is about 4’10, weighs 80 pounds and has short hair. She was last seen wearing a black dress with white stripes.

If located, the family can be contacted at (770) 757-9280 or (770) 603-0763, or dial 911.

© 2018 WXIA